Fast bowlers use the short ball as a legitimate weapon to unsettle any batsman. It is a fair and reasonable tactic that has stood the test of time. On that terrible day at the SCG in November 2014, Phillip Hughes appeared to misjudge the pace of the ball and looked to be through his hook shot before he was struck in the neck, clear of the protective face of the helmet. It was a shocking, freak accident and, especially for Phil’s family and friends, so terrible in its finality.In the wake of the Hughes’ tragedy there has been a disturbing number of quality batsmen being struck on the helmet. The “hit” list is not dominated by mid- to lower-order batsmen.  bouncer-isssue-pa-photos   Ian Chappell: “When you’re quickly on to the front foot it’s impossible to get inside the line of the delivery to play the shot more safely” © PA PhotosIn recent times players of the calibre of Steven Smith, Shane Watson, Michael Clarke, Chris Rogers and Virat Kohli have copped heavy blows to the helmet. When looking at footage of the incidents, you see all too clearly that all of the players who were hit were not watching the ball and they were struck on the side of the helmet.