Archive for August, 2011

h1

Exterminate Parasites before any Sri Lanka Cricket Elections

August 23, 2011

S. R. Pathiravithana, in Sunday Leader, 14 August 2011, under a different title

The present Interim Committtee– Pic from Sunday Leader

It was only last week we paid a glowing tribute to the new cricket management for a job that was being well executed. We always believe that when the top is strong it is not difficult for the message to cascade or even a slithering slimy stone to convert itself into a solid hard rock that could withstand pressure knowing that if the job is well done it will be mirrored all over.

You just do not have to keep opening cupboards to look for good results – the job of cricket was passed on to good hands and the players on the field are performing with new vigour. The athletic catch that Angelo Mathews and Mahela Jayawardena combined to complete just talks of a team that is well tuned and battling its way ahead. Never in the living memory of modern day cricket, has a catch being completed in that manner and this was not the first time that Mathews had raised the eye-brows of the cricketing world with a catch akin to that.

Maybe down the line of executing their duties, our cricketers may come upon a bad day at work, but, that does not mean it is the end of the world. They are a good set of cricketers and they know the performance that keeps them afloat.

Besides that, while engaged in friendly banter with a top official of the cricketing citadel last week Musings learned that things are going in the right direction and the persons who are entrusted with certain chores thus have the freedom to accomplish them with a little or no interference.

Yet we, at this end, keep wondering whether this group of people are aware that they have less time to execute their vision than the time it takes to for a woman to bring forth a child to this world. A six-month period is a limited time for the new administration which is doing well and still questions are being raised whether there is an agenda behind the agenda.

This team led by businessman Upali Dharmadasa is well aware and it was unequivocally stressed by the Sports Minister Mahindananda Aluthgamage at their inauguration that after six months he would call for elections to choose office-bearers to govern the cricket of this country for the next 365 days.
Yet is it clear that if this management does a good job within this six months — hardly a term to show their colours — would Upali be called upon to run for the chair with his team or there is some embryo who is being hatched in the heavens or else it would be a free for all where dog eat dog and the wily cat survives. Or else would Upali want to run for the chair even against the wind?

It is no secret even on the day Upali Dharmadasa was inaugurated at his position as the new Interim Committee Chairman of Sri Lanka Cricket it was not only the media that was gathered there at the sports ministry. Walking down the corridors and assembling small gangs were the scum of cricket who has made a living out of it. These parasites have lived with the game for the past few decades and fattened themselves on it with ethics or human qualities not being their concern. They flaunt their votes to a highest bidder or what they can get out of them. Down the line these characters have also built a certain skill and they have managed to work in such a line where they are responsible for a block vote and sometimes it may run to more than ten.

It is said that the SLC vote count runs to 145 votes and the break down reads as 23 affiliated members @ one vote each; 29 controlling clubs @ 2 votes each; 21 District Associations @ 2 votes each; six Associations @ 2 votes each and five provinces @ 2 votes each.

Yet it is learned that the king maker who designs and shapes every movable and immovable thing in this country holds a block vote of 46 votes which is only 28 votes short of the number of votes required to win.

Then there is another individual of the previously mentioned quality who holds a block of 17 votes. He has gone on record boasting at a VIP gathering – “I am not playing the fool. I have come here with a total of seventeen votes. If you want them, take me seriously or else I go where they would take me seriously”.

We learn that this person who has allegedly cooked the accounts even with regard to packets of meals that is given to labourers during international matches is hard at work even at this Australian tour ofSri Lanka.

So we learn that pressure gets into even a crystal sculpture. Then there is also a person who holds a block of fifteen votes, but, yet his credentials are no better those of the man of seventeen.

Then another club veteran who has a finger in the pie said, “You have to know every individual and every move of the opposition. For instance a club committee can meet and decide that they will cast their vote for one individual or split their vote into A and B in case of they are entitled to two votes. However, what happens is a candidate who knows the pulse of the certain individual and also knows how the machine works can work on the individual who is entrusted with the job of voting at the AGM and makes him a mandate breaker.”

He also added, “This is not a new thing to Sri Lanka Cricket. This is the system that has been working in this country for the past one and a half decades when Interim Committees were at place and the system will work for the foreseeable future. Maybe an individual comes forward with a load of good intentions, but, once he attends to the parasitic interests of the individuals he has very little time left to do anything else.”

He then brought forward the example of former Sri Lanka skipper Arjuna Ranatunga bid to the cricket’s hot seat. “He came with the cricket World Cup and a load of good intentions. But, he did not want to run with the existing system. So at the end of the count he ended up with seven votes to his credit. So he too learned that it is

Maybe down the line of executing their duties, our cricketers may come upon a bad day at work, but, that does not mean it is the end of the world. They are a good set of cricketers and they know the performance that keeps them afloat.

Besides that, while engaged in friendly banter with a top official of the cricketing citadel last week Musings learned that things are going in the right direction and the persons who are entrusted with certain chores thus have the freedom to accomplish them with a little or no interference.

Yet we, at this end, keep wondering whether this group of people are aware that they have less time to execute their vision than the time it takes to for a woman to bring forth a child to this world. A six-month period is a limited time for the new administration which is doing well and still questions are being raised whether there is an agenda behind the agenda.

This team led by businessman Upali Dharmadasa is well aware and it was unequivocally stressed by the Sports Minister Mahindananda Aluthgamage at their inauguration that after six months he would call for elections to choose office-bearers to govern the cricket of this country for the next 365 days.
Yet is it clear that if this management does a good job within this six months — hardly a term to show their colours — would Upali be called upon to run for the chair with his team or there is some embryo who is being hatched in the heavens or else it would be a free for all where dog eat dog and the wily cat survives. Or else would Upali want to run for the chair even against the wind?

It is no secret even on the day Upali Dharmadasa was inaugurated at his position as the new Interim Committee Chairman of Sri Lanka Cricket it was not only the media that was gathered there at the sports ministry. Walking down the corridors and assembling small gangs were the scum of cricket who has made a living out of it. These parasites have lived with the game for the past few decades and fattened themselves on it with ethics or human qualities not being their concern. They flaunt their votes to a highest bidder or what they can get out of them. Down the line these characters have also built a certain skill and they have managed to work in such a line where they are responsible for a block vote and sometimes it may run to more than ten.

It is said that the SLC vote count runs to 145 votes and the break down reads as 23 affiliated members @ one vote each; 29 controlling clubs @ 2 votes each; 21 District Associations @ 2 votes each; six Associations @ 2 votes each and five provinces @ 2 votes each.

Yet it is learned that the king maker who designs and shapes every movable and immovable thing in this country holds a block vote of 46 votes which is only 28 votes short of the number of votes required to win.

Then there is another individual of the previously mentioned quality who holds a block of 17 votes. He has gone on record boasting at a VIP gathering – “I am not playing the fool. I have come here with a total of seventeen votes. If you want them, take me seriously or else I go where they would take me seriously”.

We learn that this person who has allegedly cooked the accounts even with regard to packets of meals that is given to labourers during international matches is hard at work even at this Australian tour ofSri Lanka.

So we learn that pressure gets into even a crystal sculpture. Then there is also a person who holds a block of fifteen votes, but, yet his credentials are no better those of the man of seventeen.

Then another club veteran who has a finger in the pie said, “You have to know every individual and every move of the opposition. For instance a club committee can meet and decide that they will cast their vote for one individual or split their vote into A and B in case of they are entitled to two votes. However, what happens is a candidate who knows the pulse of the certain individual and also knows how the machine works can work on the individual who is entrusted with the job of voting at the AGM and makes him a mandate breaker.”

He also added, “This is not a new thing to Sri Lanka Cricket. This is the system that has been working in this country for the past one and a half decades when Interim Committees were at place and the system will work for the foreseeable future. Maybe an individual comes forward with a load of good intentions, but, once he attends to the parasitic interests of the individuals he has very little time left to do anything else.”

He then brought forward the example of former Sri Lanka skipper Arjuna Ranatunga bid to the cricket’s hot seat. “He came with the cricket World Cup and a load of good intentions. But, he did not want to run with the existing system. So at the end of the count he ended up with seven votes to his credit. So he too learned that it is is only a different game that would bring him to his desired seat and he just did that”.

h1

The Argus Review: Axe falls for the men who sacked Katich

August 23, 2011

Courtesy of The Weekend Australian, 20-21 August 2011, http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/sport/axe-falls-for-the-men-who-sacked-simon-katich/story-e6frg7rx-1226118423719 ……Its come too late to save the Ashes or Simon Katich, but the men who axed the prolific opener two months ago have lost their jobs as part of the wide ranging Australian Cricket Review released yesterday.  Chairman Andrew Hilditch and talent development manager Greg Chappell are both gone from that selection panel and the last man on the panel, Jamie Cox, is no certainty to keep his job. Head coach Tim Nielsen is also left to consider his future after his job was redefined and he was told he could reapply for it.’s

Pic from AFP

Chair of the review, Don Argus, claimed yesterday that it “was not a witch hunt” and chairman of Cricket Australia Jack Clarke insisted that “it should not be seen as scapegoating”, but the report has clearly taken aim at the roles of selectors. The players, coaches and elite performance structures, however, do not escape blame for the failures of Australian cricket. Under the new selection set-up, which CA says it aims to establish soon, there will be a five-man panel with a full-time chairman. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Upali Dharmadasa, the SLC chief, slams Interim Committees

August 23, 2011

Saroj Pathirana, for the BBC Sinhala Service, 21 August 2011

The head of Sri Lanka Cricket says the continuous appointment of Interim Committtees  over the years to run the country’s richest sports body has paved the way for what he calls a greedy culture. Upali Dharmadasa, who was recently appointed by the sports minister as the new chairman of the chairman of the interim committee (IC), says that only two governing bodies were democratically elected since 1998. “The SLC has been controlled by nine interim committees, including me, since then,” he told BBC Sandeshaya. “This (the new culture) is a direct result of the appointment of interim committees.”

‘Injustice’: He said the continuous appointment of the ICs by consecutive governments is an injustice to the game of cricket. The IC chief described the recent controversy over a group of junior coaches refusing to provide voluntary assistance to organise the current Sri Lanka Vs Australia series as a ‘clear indication of the greedy culture created as a result of cricket management by ICs’.

Mr Dharmadasa said he took over the chairmanship of the new interim committee, on the request of the minister, to sort out alleged malpractices including financial irregularities during the recently concluded cricket World Cup and to pave the way for and elected governing body. “I would like to see that the clubs, affiliate clubs and district associations once again working to uplift cricket. That is what we had before,” the chairman who took over the reigns from DS de Silva on 01 July said. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Shelley Wickremasinghe: A Giant of a Man

August 18, 2011

Mahinda Wijesinghe

The passing away of 86-year old Shelley Wickremasinghe on 11 August 2011 was yet another instance of the law of the world in operation, that “all compounded phenomena are subject to change.” Or expressed in lay terms: a mighty oak had fallen. Shelley was known to me for over 40 years and was always amazed at his composure when faced with the many vicissitudes he faced in life – and solved. Attempting to pay a deserving tribute to a multi-faceted personality who reached the zenith of all his worldly pursuits is a well-nigh insurmountable task. Reminds me of the Jataka Story when a squirrel strained to empty the mighty ocean with its little tail.

As we all know, he was an outstanding and a pioneering engineer of repute, a loving husband, a caring father and was a tower of strength not only to his own siblings but also to his in-laws, and the grandchildren whom he simply adored. Indeed, just a couple of days before his demise, and despite his failing health, the Wickremasinghe godfather had taken all of them out for dinner – stating that “this time it is going to be my treat.” However, I hope the family would not take much offence when I say that his devotion and services to Bloomfield came a fairly close second to his family duties and obligations. Remember, he served the club as President during the many turbulent years so ably for over 25 years, probably a record without parallel.

Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Gamini Goonasena: Tribute to a legend

August 18, 2011

Rodney Cavalier

Former Sri Lanka captain Gamini Goonasena died in Canberra last week. Gamini was a familiar name to us who were born after the War and grew up inSydney. Just as were being captured by the glories of cricket, we encountered Gamini Goonasena. He was a player out of the ordinary. Such a striking name. A black in a team of whites. Gamini was born in a country then called Ceylon. As a child of Empire, he was playing county cricket in England, first for Nottingham, then Cambridge University. He was a right-arm leg-spinner who gave the ball plenty of flight. When the wickets were helpful he could bring off prodigious spin. He was more than a useful batsman: his score of 211 in the annualOxfordvCambridgematch in 1957 remains the record for a Cambridgebatsman. He played seven times for the Gentlemen against the Players, itself a record. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Murali and Kushil raise Monies for Mankulam Venture in Los Angeles

August 18, 2011

Nandasena Jasentuliyana

It takes an Organizing Committee Chairman like Mohan Chandramohan, the successful businessman, entrepreneur and philanthropist, to make a fundraiser, not only classy and enjoyable, but to raise large sums of money for a good cause.

Pic of Chandramohan, Murali and Kushil

Well known champion fast bowler of Sri Lankan and World Cricket, Murali is not only the Manager of the Foundation of Goodness in Sri Lanka, but he is a spokesman who has a passion for this organization which was started in Seenigama (near Hikkaduwa) in 1999 by Kushil Gunasekera who is the Founder.  The Foundation of Goodness is aptly named, and as Murali puts it, “Be Good, Do Good”.  Their trip toLos Angeleswas organized by Mohan through his friendship with Ajith “Ando” Dias.  The fundraiser was sponsored by the Sri Lanka America Association of Southern California and the Sri Lanka Foundation.  There were also many others in the Committee who helped make this event a success.

 The Foundation of Goodness is dedicated to taking care of the needs of the underprivileged, with health, well being, community development, sports development, housing and education as some of their aims.  Murali, as Manager and spokesman, gives inspiration to others to do what they can to help brighten the lives of those who would otherwise be forgotten.  The President ofSri Lanka, Mahinda Rajapaksa generously allocated 50 acres in Mankulam for this project which will help those in the North and East of Sri Lanka. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

“Botham the Legend of ’81” is a superb video

August 17, 2011

Mango, 24 July 2011  in http://thecarthaginiansolution.wordpress.com/2011/07/24/botham-the-legend-of-%E2%80%9981-%E2%80%93-get-the-video/

 If you missed seeing “Botham: The Legend of ’81”, a superb BBC documentary on the incredible story of how Ian Botham went from national zero to hero, not once but twice, download it by clicking on the link noted below. Even if you’re not that interested in cricket, this is worth watching.

 Synopsis:  The film deals with the most remarkable comeback story in English sporting history, and it all began 30 years ago. It is the story of a team so abject they had been written off completely, led by a man so distrusted and ridiculed that he was forced to resign his post for the sake of his family. Days later, that same man, Ian Botham, produced a ‘boys own’ performance to inspire England to beat Australia against 500-1 odds. It was just the start of Botham’s Ashes. Having been reduced to zero once more we see how the anti-establishment Botham unwittingly became a national hero once again, this time through his tireless work to help children suffering with leukaemia.

Featuring contributions from Beefy, his family, colleagues and eyewitnesses such as Sir Mick Jagger, Sir Viv Richards, Sir John Major, Stephen Fry, Sir Elton John, Bob Willis and David Gower, this documentary charts one of English sport’s and cricket’s most colourful and controversial careers and tells its most enduring comeback story.

Beefy in Sri Lanka:  Botham has also leant his considerable reputation to help the Foundation of Goodness, a Sri Lankan charity set up by Muttiah Muralitharan. On his regular trips to Sri Lanka he visited Seenigama post-Tsunami in 2004 and in 2011 he visited Mankulam post-war to support and publicise the plight of people affected by natural (Tsunami) and man-made (War) disasters.

h1

Russel Arnold earns plaudits

August 17, 2011

Russell Palipane, in The Island, 17 August 2011

Sri Lanka, over the years, has had its share of excellent radio and TV cricket commentators. And now we have another one. He is Russel Premakumaran Arnold, who in my opinion, ranks among the best in the world. He is witty, knowledgeable and so easy on the ear. An unbiased observer will state that he is very much on par with the likes of Michael Holding, Ian Bishop, Tony Greig, Sanjay Manjrekar, Ian Chappell and our own Roshan Abeysinghe.

Man for a crisis:  Russel Arnold retired from international cricket after the 2007 CWC in the Caribbean. In fact, it was ‘The Island’ Sports Editor who exclusively reported that in an extensive interview with the amiable cricketer, just prior to the final, where Sri Lanka emerged as the second best team, behind Ricky Ponting’s Australians.   He was the ideal man for a crisis. On many an occasion, when Sri Lanka’s top order batsmen failed, the rangy left hand bat came to the rescue of the team. He was also a useful right arm off-spinner and an agile fielder. Arnold’s ability to adapt his game to the situation made him an ideal No.6 in limited overs cricket and an unselfish approach explains the high esteem, in which he is still held by his former teammates.       Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Kushil and Murali reach out for FOG in Los Angeles

August 16, 2011

There was fund raising event in LOS ANGELES on the 13th August for FOG organised by a cross-ethnic body of Sri Lankans with Murali and Kushil as stars; and I received this note from Naj Nagendran, one of the chief organisers:

 Pic of Kushil and MuralI with American college students and Helen Brohier ( FoG, pre-school head) who volunteered at the event

“Michael, The event was successful – 530 attended. Aravinda De Silva and Sanath Jayasuriya joined Murali in LA. Kushil was as usual impressive in showcasing what has been achieved in Seenigama and the progress so far in the Mankulam project. His appeals for funds was well received and excess of $ 200,000 in donations is expected. Murali was very passionate   in his appeal for the Northern project

 They are heading to San Fransisco for similar fundraising events.'” NAGE

 Pic of Kushil with Carl Strecker ( movie producer) who has visited Seenigama post tsunami with medical team and producer of latest  FoG video

 This video is a must see … and must circulate to friends who are not buried in the caverns of bitterness and anger that disable them fromseeing any progress in sri Lanka. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egUNMCg-izM&feature=related

Do also visit the FOG sie for reports on what is being done, step by step, at Mankulam. SEE http://foundationofgoodness.org/m-sectors_north.php. I have jsut got a report from Anura de Silva re the Third Training Camp at Mankulam Maha Vidyalayam –repeat vidyalayam — where training was provided for 12 girls in netball, 22 and 15 boys in cricket and volleyball respectively.

The following are the web references for the Mankulam reports/pics.

*http://www.unconditionalcompassion.org/sub/20110712_2ndCoaching.php

* http://www.unconditionalcompassion.org/sub/201100614_fristever.php

h1

Norton Frederick, Our “Fiery Fred”

August 14, 2011

Sa’adi Tawfeeq, in  The Nation

Norton Fredrick, the former Ceylon fast bowler must be the only cricketer in the country and possibly in the world to have a road named after him. He lives at Norton Place in Enderamulla, Wattala. The road was named after him ten years ago by the people of the area in recognition of the social service he and his wife Nalini did for them. Fredrick is the chartered president of the Lions Club of Enderamulla. At 72 years Fredrick is quite fit and healthy and still goes to work daily. He handles administration and human resources at an ISO building company KSJ Construction run by his friend Sarath Jayabahu.

 The Eleven that beat India 1964/65 with Norton Fredrick squatting second from left next between DP de Silva and Lasantha Rodrigo — Pic from Manio Ponniah Album in Essaying Cricket

Although stockily built for a fast bowler, Fredrick had all the ingredients that go to make a fast bowler – a short temper and the speed to cause grievous injury to batsmen although that thought was furthest from his mind. Fredrick’s four-year career withCeylonwas short, but he made a big impact in those few years as a new-ball bowler. Although not the orthodox type, Fredrick generated a great deal of pace, his most potent delivery being the inswinger bowled with a high arm action with which he beat batsmen regularly and bowled them through the gate often hitting the bails. He wasSri Lanka’s version of ‘Fiery Fred’ the name given to formerEnglandfast bowler Fred Trueman.

Fredrick rarely suffered an injury throughout his entire cricket career. “I never suffered from cramps until I got one holding onto a return catch given by Indian batsman Chandu Borde. Only then did I know what a cramp was,” Fredericktold The Nation. “I maintained my physique doing wind sprints after practice for about one hour and parallel bar exercises.”
Fredrick’s most memorable match was the unofficial Test against India played at Ahmedabad in 1965 where he creamed the top order of the strong Indian batting line-up in both innings to set up a historic four-wicket win for his country. That victory till today remains the only ‘Test’ win for Sri Lanka on Indian soil.
Fredrick took seven wickets in the match (4/85 off 28 overs and 3/24 off 11 overs) and amongst his victims was opening bat Dilip Sardesai (twice), Indian captain the Nawab of Pataudi (twice), Farokh Engineer, Abbas Ali Baig and Hanumant Singh, who according to Fredrick was the best batsman inIndia at the time.India was put out for totals of 189 and 66.

Recalling that momentous occasion Fredrick said: “The wicket was rather soggy and it helped not only me but all the Ceylonbowlers. The Indians were not used to wickets where the ball swung a lot as most of them were front foot players. The wickets were not covered at the time and the rain helped. I just held the ball on the seam and bowled just short of length. The ball did the rest either it rose or swung.”
But strangely enough Fredrick never played cricket for his schoolSt Joseph’s,Colombo the ten years he was a student there because he bowled with a square arm action. “I bowled so fast that I used to injure children at under-13 and 14 bowling with a tennis ball. But when I went for first eleven practices the coach Stanislaus Fernando said that I had a square arm action and dropped me from the team. I never played any first eleven cricket. They were at the time favouring the boarders.”

It was when Fredrick joined the Prisons Department as a welfare officer that his cricket career really started to take shape. WAN Silva the formerSri Lankacoach who was two years senior to Fredrick encouraged him to joinBloomfieldin 1959 and in the first match he played he took five wickets and never looked back since. He played eight years of Sara trophy division I cricket forBloomfieldhelping them win the title in 1963-64 under Noel Perera by taking 57 wickets. In his entire career forBloomfieldhe captured 183 wickets (avg. 16.58). The four years he represented his country (1964-1968) againstAustralia, MCC,IndiaandPakistan, Fredrick opened bowling with Darrel Lieversz and then with Ian Pieris and played under the leadership of CI Gunasekara and Michael Tissera.

Fredrick was forced to end his cricket career in 1968 when his father passed away and he had to take on a load of family responsibilities. He was to captainBloomfieldin 1967 but stood down because of his other commitments. After serving Prisons Department for seven years, he joined the Ceylon Transport Board (CTB) as assistant depot superintendent. For the next 24 years he served them in various positions and from 1988-90 he was chairman of Regional Transport Board. “It was the worst period in the country. We had the JVP insurrection and they killed 24 of my employees and even threatened my life.”

Fredrick played cricket for CTB for 20 years and captained their veteran’s team. He was also vice-president of the National Services Cricket Association. He became the first chairman of the WesternProvincetransport authority before joining East West as general manager. He was among the first lot of match referees appointed by Sri Lanka Cricket in 2000 to officiate in domestic matches. He did it for about eight years before quitting because of unfair treatment he and some others received when they were sidelined from important assignments. He returned briefly to perform public announcements at international matches for SLC, but was critical of the interim committee chairman DS de Silva for putting a stop to a five-year talent search programme (begun by Aravinda de Silva) where he along with another former Ceylon cricketer Muttiah Devaraj had begun unearthing some exiting talent like Angelo Mathews, Lahiru Thirimanne, Chatura Peiris and Ramith Rambukwella.
“I have my reservations about DS de Silva. He played cricket with me during my time and whenever he sees me he shows his thigh where all the seam marks are there where I had hit him. I am very hurt that DS has refused to look at us. Once they get to a higher position they completely forget others and only look after themselves,” said Fredrick.

“DS should have looked after the past cricketers. There are about 15-20 of us who are given a paltry pension by the Cricketers’ Association of about Rs. 10,000 a month. Many of the past cricketers today are in dire straits. I have told the Cricketers Association to hand over the pension scheme to Sri Lanka Cricket because they have the money, but it has never happened. It is the moral duty on the part of the Sri Lanka Cricket to look after the past cricketers. There were some people who were not cricketers who headed interim committees in the past; they at least looked after us better than cricketers who came to those positions. It’s very unfortunate the way things have happened.

“We are the pioneers who sustained the country’s cricket for it to obtain Test status. We did the spade work for today’s cricketers to benefit for what remuneration, nothing. We touredIndiafor Rs. 15 a day and we were given a blazer and a black trouser. We didn’t bother about money because nobody gave and nobody wanted it. Remuneration was never in our mind when we played. We wanted to play the game and we were happy to go and represent our country,” Fredrick said.

Fredrick was a strong critic of the national team having a big support staff to accompany them on tours. Currently there are about nine including the selector on tour. “These guys are paid handsome salaries and taken on tours. What are their professional qualifications? Apart from cricket what are they academically? Sri Lanka Cricket is wasting a lot of money hiring foreign coaches and having such a large entourage. They should save this money and use it to develop our cricket.”

“I am dead against having foreign coaches. They may be brought in short stints. What are they going to teach our national cricketers who have come through the mill from their junior playing days. Our coaches are very good. You have to train the boys in their formative years and teach them the correct technique in batting and bowling. You don’t need a bowling coach when they are playing for Sri Lanka. The Lankan coaches do a very good job and they should be handling our national team. Why should they go out and coach in countries like Nepaland Bangladesh. We are not colonial relics anymore,” Fredrick said.
The Fredricks are Ranaviru parents having lost one of their two sons Harsha during the LTTE attack on the Mullaitivu Army camp in 1996. His other son Ushantha lives with his wife Bishani in the same neighbourhood.