Archive for September, 2011

h1

Aussies celebrate their hold on the Murali-Warne Trophy

September 22, 2011

 Pic from Sunday Times

h1

Carl Rackemann as farmer politician … so Sanath is not alone

September 22, 2011

Michael McKenna, in The Australian,22 September 2011

CARL Rackemann put the fear into batsmen when he took the ball – now the former Test cricketer’s ambition of taking to the field of politics is gathering the same pace his once-devastating bouncers had.  A third-generation Kingaroy farmer, the 12-Test bowler is firming as the frontrunner to win the state seat of Nanango, held for 40 years by former premier Joh Bjelke-Petersen, as a candidate of Bob Katter’s Australian Party. The start-up political entity is expected to win registration within days from Queensland’s Electoral Commission, as the party ramps up its campaign to challenge the political mainstream at the next state election, due by March. Party insiders are boasting of a campaign war chest that will exceed $2 million, with more than $500,000 already donated from a disparate band of backers that includes a union, an arms dealer and fishing and ethanol lobbyists normally welded to the Nationals. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

World T20 for Sri Lanka next year– launch media event

September 22, 2011
 Courtesy of the Daily News, 21 Sept 2011 The ICC and Sri Lanka Cricket launched the WT20 Sri Lanka 2012 with a grand ceremony at the Ceylon Continental, yesterday. Reigning champion England will start its title defence at the R Premadasa Stadium in Colombo on September 21 against one of the two qualifiers for the tournament. Stuart Broad’s side will complete its opening group commitments two days later against 2007 champion India at the same venue. Haroon Lorgat [CEO, ICC], Kumar Sangakkara, Sri Lanka women’s team captain Shashikala Siriwardena, andUpali Dharmadasa, chairman, SLC,  at yesterday’s launch

Australia, chasing the one global trophy to have eluded them, will go head-to-head with the other qualifier in Colombo on September 19, part of a double-header that also features India and a qualifer. Sri Lanka, which lost toEnglandin the semi-final of last year’s tournament in the West Indies, will open its campaign against Zimbabwe under lights in Hambantota on the first day of the tournament (September 18) before taking on South Africa at the same venue on September 22. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Tom Moody reviews Sri Lankan Cricket Scene

September 21, 2011

From SKYNEWS at http://www.skynews.com.au/sport/article.aspx?id=662380&vId=

Sri Lanka haven’t won a Test since Muttiah Muralidaran retired back in July last year, a run stretching over 10 matches following the draw with Australia in Kandy. The game’s administration in the country is also struggling, a permanent replacement is yet to be appointed for former coach Trevor Bayliss. The Australian departed following April’s World Cup, before the country’s sports minister dissolved the cricket administration in July amid allegations of corruption and mismanagement, while rumours continued to circulate about players who were unsure of new captain Tillakaratne Dilshan’s leadership qualities.

But former Australian Test player Moody, who coached Sri Lanka from 2005-07, believes getting past the departure of retired greats like Muralidaran, fast bowler Chaminda Vaas and batsman Sanath Jayasuriya will be the nation’s biggest challenge. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

That underarm moment in World Cricket History …. so Un-Iconic

September 18, 2011

 1 February 1981: “Richie Benaud said this the most disgraceful thing he had seen on a cricket field. On February 1, 1981, New Zealand were playing Australia in the third of the best-of-five finals of the World Series in Melbourne. 15 were needed off the final over, to be bowled by Trevor Chappell, younger brother of Ian and Greg. It came down to seven off the last ball with Brian McKechnie on strike. Captain Greg instructed Trevor to roll the ball along the ground. Underarm bowling was still legal, even if unethical, and Chappell’s unsporting act was roundly criticised. After the incident, underarm bowling was banned.” — http://www.sharegoodstuffs.com/2011/09/crickets-most-iconic-moments.htmhttp://

h1

Try explaining cricket’s intricacies to a wild elephant !!

September 18, 2011

A wild elephant ponders a cricketing scene in the boondocks of Sri Lanka’s jungle area as soldiers pursue recreational fun

h1

Iconic Momens of World Cup Celebration

September 17, 2011

                                                                                                      

 Edgbaston, 17 June 1999:     “Australian players celebrate after running out South Africa’s Allan Donald in the World Cupsemi-final inBirmingham on June 17, 1999. A massive misunderstanding in the final over between last-man Donald and Lance Klusener, who had batted heroically to bring SA within a run of a win, ended the game in a tie. Tournament rules allowedAustralia to reach the final, which they won, beginning their decade-long domination of international cricket.” —http://www.sharegoodstuffs.com/2011/09/crickets-most-iconic-moments.html

  Lahore, 17 March 1996: “The Sri Lankan team swarm unto thepitch to share the joy of Arjuna Ranatunga and Aravinda de Silva after they completed a decisive victory  in the Final of the World Cup.”

Note umpire Steve Bucknor with a stump–is that a souvenir or the stump with audi-or camera cam?

h1

Sanga bowls us over

September 17, 2011

Peter Roebuck, in cricinfo,

Kumar Sangakkara counts among the most polished and prudent of batsmen. Nothing catches the eye about his work except its consistency and efficiency. Although he pulls and cuts efficiently and often, and uses his feet to spinners purposefully, and though he added 624 in an innings with Mahela Jayawardene once, there is something understated and underappreciated about his batting. Perhaps it is that he does not breathe fire, or not often, or withdraw into a cocoon or attack without mercy or resist obstinately or change tempo obviously or grit teeth anxiously or in any other way engage spectators and take them on the journey with him.

Rather, he gets on with the job in a determined, restrained and mostly amiable way. However, character is not to be confused with personality. It takes a lot of courage and commitment to maintain a high standard for a long period, to endure many upheavals and to be a regular in all forms of the game. He has out-stared many bowlers, survived many crises and always retained his educated equanimity. Not even the gunmen in Lahore could put him off his game. Afterwards he said that his country, too, had its troubles and that he would happily come back. Such men are born to bat at first wicket down.

Sanga’s character exists not so much on the outside as within. It is not colour he seeks so much as conquest, not passion so much as purity. At times he resembles a businessman going about his duties – the focus on the bottom line, reckless risks disdained. He is professional as opposed to combative, trusting training more than instinct, research more than hunches. In a way it limited his captaincy – Jayawardene reads the game better because he has less faith in reason. Sanga’s focus is not so much upon the performance as on the task and the career. Cricket called him, challenged him, even though his head was full of literature, even though he had many safer alternatives. He had to make it work. His ruthlessness comes from this need to succeed. Read the rest of this entry ?

h1

Great Indian Innings of Iconic Character

September 17, 2011

Courtesy of http://www.sharegoodstuffs.com/2011/09/crickets-most-iconic-moments.html

 Kapil Dev during his innings of 175 against Zimbabwe at Tunbridge Wells on June 18, 1983 during the World Cup. When he walked in to bat India’s scoreboard read 9-4 and soon became 17-5). Kapil proceeded to pound 175 off 138 balls with 16 fours and six sixes, establishing a new record score for ODIs.India’s qualification to the semi-final was on the line when they facedZimbabwe. Revitalised by Kapil’s feat and their victory in this match,Indiawent on to stun West Indies in the final.

                                                                                                     

Manoj Prabhakar pats Sachin Tendulkar at the end of the Manchester Test match against England on August 11, 1990. The two Indians’ rearguard action saved India the Test with Tendulkar making an unbeaten 119 – his first Test hundred. Tendulkar, 17, thus became the youngest Indian to score a Test hundred, and would go on to claim most batting records in international cricket.

                                                               

India’s Yuvraj Singh hits the sixth six of an over from England Stuart Broad on September 19 2007 at Kingsmead, Durbanduring a World T20 match. Yuvraj became just the fourth batsman in history to hit six consecutive sixes in an over in senior cricket. Minutes before this incident, Andrew Flintoff had sledged Yuvraj about his ordinary form, prompting this angry outburst on Broad.

One must not, of course, forget what VVS Lakshman and Rahul Dravid achieved in that famous Test Match at Eden Gardens –surely this feat in a Test arena overwhlems other feats in ODI circumtstances. Michael Roberts

h1

Two Iconic Moments in Sri Lankan Cricket History

September 16, 2011

Courtesy of http://www.sharegoodstuffs.com/2011/09/crickets-most-iconic-moments.html

 When the scoreboard at Pietermaritzburg Oval read 5 runs in total with 4 wickets down, for Bangladesa  after Chaminda Vaas took a hat-trick and then another wicket in the first over. 

                                                                                                          

 Arjuna Ranatunga reprimands the umpire Ross Emerson during the infamous  contretemps at Adelaide Oval on 23 January 1999 after Eemrson –in what is now known to be a pre-planned move — no-balled Muralitharan for chucking the ball.

For clarification of the events leading up to this incident and a ‘post-mortem’ See Michael Roberts, “Saving Murali: Action On-field and Off-field, 1995-2005, in Roberts, Incursions and Excursions in and around Sri Lankan Cricket, Colombo: Vijitha Yapa Publications, 20011, pp. 111-38 … ISBN 978-955-53198-0-5

Also see articles by Rohit Brijnath, Peter Roebuck, Bernard Whimpress, Glucka Wijesuriya and Michael Roberts in Roberts, Essaying Cricket. Sri Lanka and Beyond, Colombo:  Vijitha Yapa Publications, 2006 ….  ISBN 955-1266-25-0 (pbk) and 955-1266-26-9 (hbk) …………………… where some other striking photographs can be viewed.