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Sri Lanka mauled, besmirched and quartered

December 28, 2015

Michael Roberts

New Zealand made mincemeat out of the Sri Lankan batting and hammered the bowling to the kingdoms beyond inn two consecutive ODIs. Home advantage is not the only reason surely. Sri Lanka’s batting was poor, the Kiwi bowling attack (with several reserves in the squad) was sharp, the fielding in the second ODI was brilliant. But WOW what a gap in performance and thus in implied capacity between the two sides. Congratulations to New Zealand, its pacies … and to Guptill yesterday for a brilliant innings –outdoing Jayasuriya in his prime and matching Ab Villiers today…

New Zealand’s Martin Guptill celebrates after scoring a double century while batting against the West Indies during their Cricket World Cup quarterfinal match in Wellington, New Zealand, Saturday, March 21, 2015. (AP Photo/NZ Herald, Mark Mitchell)

New Zealand’s Martin Guptill celebrates ….(AP Photo/NZ Herald, Mark Mitchell)

Stats highlights from an incredible New Zealand win in Christchurch … courtesy of Bharath Seervi and ESPNcricinfo
 
Martin Guptill’s 30-ball 93 came at a strike rate of 310 © ESPNcricinfo Ltd

250 Balls left in the New Zealand innings when they completed the run-chase. The margin is the seventh-largest in ODI history.

3 Times New Zealand have won an ODI with 250 or more balls remaining. Sri Lanka have done it twice, and England and Australia once each. New Zealand are the only team, though, to also win these games by ten wickets.

14.16 New Zealand’s run rate in this chase, the second highest in any ODI innings. They had chased 94 in six overs against Bangladesh in Queenstown in 2007, at a rate of 15.83, which is the highest. The top four run rates in an ODI innings are all by New Zealand.

17 Deliveries needed by Martin Guptill to complete his half-century, the second-fastest in ODI history. Only AB de Villiers has got there quicker, off 16 balls against West Indies in Johannesburg earlier this year. Guptill’s effort is the fastest for New Zealand, beating Brendon McCullum’s 18-ball effort against England in the 2015 World Cup.

310 Guptill’s strike rate in his unbeaten innings of 93 off 30 balls. It is the second-highest for a 50-plus score in ODIs. The highest is 338.63 by de Villiers in his innings of 149 off 44 balls.

39 Balls required by New Zealand to complete their 100, the fastest for any team since 2002. The earlier record was also held by them: against England in the 2015 World Cup, they got there in 40 balls. In this game, they reached 50 off 16 balls, which is also the fastest since 2002.

20.50 Dushmantha Chameera’s economy rate in the two overs he bowled: he conceded 41 in those overs. There have been only two instances of poorer economy rates for a bowler bowling two or more overs in an ODI. The top four such figures have all been against New Zealand.

19 The top score for Sri Lanka, their fourth-lowest top score in ODIs in which at least ten batsmen have batted.

2 Totals lower than 117 for Sri Lanka against New Zealand in ODIs (in innings when they have been bowled out). Their lowest is 112, also in Christchurch, in 2007.

5 Times Sri Lanka have been all out for less than 200 runs in ODIs this year – the most among the Full Member sides. Apart from the two instances in this series, they were also all out for 195 against New Zealand, 133 against South Africa and 181 against Pakistan.

93 Runs scored by Guptill in his team’s first 50 balls – the most by a batsman in his team’s first 50 balls since 2002. Brendon McCullum scored an unbeaten 80, which is the second-highest, but in only six overs in the Queenstown ODI against Bangladesh in 2007.

5 Number of four-wicket hauls for Matt Henry in ODIs. All of them have come against Asian teams – two each against Sri Lanka and Pakistan, and one against India on debut. He has taken 27 wickets in eight innings against these three teams and just nine wickets in nine innings against the other teams.

Bharath Seervi is stats sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo. @SeerviBharath

 

 

 

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