Archive for the ‘bowling average’ Category

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Another Milestone for Herath

February 10, 2018

Rangana Herath went past Wasim Akram to become the most prolific left-arm bowler in Test history when he dismissed Bangladesh’s last wicket. Akram took 414 wickets at an average of 23.62 in 104 matches. Herath, on the other hand, was playing only the 89th Test of his career. New Zealand’s Daniel Vettori is third on this list with 362 wicket from 113 matches. Chaminda Vaas, Mitchell Johnson and Zaheer Khan are the only other left-armers to take at least 300 Tests wickets.

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Akila The Hun … in Hunanjaya!!

February 10, 2018

“Debutant Akila Dananjaya was prime destroyer. He scythed rapidly through the Bangladesh lower-middle order, taking 5 for 24 to make it eight wickets on debut – the best performance by a Sri Lankan on debut” … Andrew Fidel Fernando …. http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/18527/report/1130745/day/3/

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Spin ‘n Spin: Dramatic Fifth Day Victory for Sri Lanka

October 2, 2017

Andrew Fidel Fernando, courtesy of ESPNcricinfo, 3 October 2017, where the title runs   “Herath’s 400th wicket seals dramatic victory for Sri Lanka”

How did we get here? How did we hurtle, from the dullest 11 sessions of Test cricket possible, to this stirring, heart-palpitating, dramedy of a conclusion? Sri Lanka, out of the match surely when they set out to defend 136 after lunch, yet victors by 21 runs, Rangana Herath breaking records, scuttling Pakistan again – 6 for 43 to his name. The pitch began to sing for him, the batsmen played him with fatal hesitation, Dilruwan Perera was even denied the winning wicket by a no-ball, just so Herath could complete 400 Test wickets – the first left-arm spinner to the milestone.

 Sri Lanka go wild after Rangana Herath gets rid of Asad Shafiq Francois Nel/Getty Images Read the rest of this entry ?

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Murali chats with Ishara about his Life in Cricket

December 22, 2016

Ishara Jayawardane, in  Daily News, 22 December 2016, with the title “A spin with the spin master”

Modest yet amazing, and humble yet incredible. A man of very few words but mighty deeds. Outstanding Personalities features spin bowler Muttiah Muralitharan who is regarded as the greatest bowler in the history of test cricket. Muralitharan holds the world record for the most number of wickets in both test and one-day cricket.

Q. Murali, you are the greatest bowler in test cricket and one day internationals claiming the highest number of wickets; 800 in test cricket and 534 in one-day international cricket. How do you evaluate your career?

A. I had a great career. I am very happy about what I have achieved. And I became the highest wicket taker in both forms of the game. So I am very happy about it.

 

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In Appreciation of Johnny Gleeson, Quiet Man of Cricket

October 23, 2016

Bernard Whimpress, courtesy of  The Footy Almanac, 14 October 2016, where the title is Quiet man of cricket: a tribute to Johnny Gleeson”

Another good man leaves us.

Remember the days when Australian Test cricketers carried an air of mystique. When they weren’t thrust upon us. When they went about their business with quiet dignity. When bowlers obviously had plans to dismiss top-line batsmen on the other side and didn’t blather on about ‘targeting’ them. When there was a little more grace in the game.

john-gleeson-cricinfoPic from ESPNcricinfo

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“A quick bowler with attitude,” that’s Dhammika Prasad

June 29, 2015

Andrew Fidel Fernando, courtesy of ESPNcricinfo, 29 June 2015

Dhammika Prasad is a fast bowler who won his way through to Test level playing most of his cricket at the Sinhalese Sports Club ground. For that alone, he deserves a little respect. If the pitch at the SSC is ever dug up, multiple remains of quick bowlers are sure to be discovered. The other first-class decks on the island are not much better. At 32 years, a hit-the-deck seamer like Prasad should be a fossil. Instead, he is Sri Lanka’s top wicket-taker in the series so far.

Sri Lankan cricketer Dhammika Prasad makes an unsuccessful appeal for the wicket of Pakistan cricketer Asad Shafiq during the fourth day of the opening Test match between Sri Lanka and Pakistan at the Galle International Cricket Stadium in Galle on June 20, 2015. AFP PHOTO/ Ishara S. KODIKARA        (Photo credit should read Ishara S. KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Sri Lankan cricketer Dhammika Prasad makes an unsuccessful appeal for the wicket of Pakistan cricketer Asad Shafiq during the fourth day of the opening Test match between Sri Lanka and Pakistan at the Galle International Cricket Stadium in Galle on June 20, 2015. AFP PHOTO/ Ishara S. KODIKARA (Photo credit should read Ishara S. KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images)

The thing with Prasad is that he just keeps coming back – on a micro and macro scale. The P Sara pitch had slowed considerably by day four, with the wicketkeeper more often taking balls at knee height than above the waist, as had been the case on the first morning. Yet, it was neither of the spinners, the swing bowler, or the tearaway who regained Sri Lanka’s advantage in the match. Pitching it outside off, moving it a little off the seam, Prasad just kept on coming. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Mark Nicholas on the art of finger spinning –THEN and NOW

August 12, 2013

Mark Nicholas, courtesy of ESPNcricinfo, where the title reads “Lyon’s simple ploy that foxed England”

Once upon a time, off-spin was an uncomplicated thing. The blokes tried to drift the ball away from the bat in the air and spin it back to the stumps. Most of them had an arm ball, an outswinger effectively, that was bowled with the seam upright as a variation to the off-break. Off-spinners constantly searched for a way to beat the outside edge so that batsmen could not set themselves against the natural movement of the ball which was designed to beat the inside edge.

nathan lyonat durham Lyon appeals — Getty Images

Finger-spinners were dynamite in the days of uncovered pitches, when, after rain, the ball gripped in the damp surface, often ripping out pieces of the turf and causing general chaos with the extravagant turn and extra bounce. The accepted methods of response were to play back and late, with the spin; to play forward but to lead with the bat, rather than with bat and pad together as this brought short leg and silly point into play, or to come down the pitch and meet the ball on the full toss or half-volley. For this, batsmen needed quick feet and a certain courage. Some said you were better stumped by a mile than a whisker because at least you had committed. Read the rest of this entry ?