Archive for the ‘cricketing rules’ Category

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Kaboom Bats and theIr burgeoning market — Harry Solomons of Kingsgrove Sports speaks

March 8, 2017

Speaking to The Australian, Harry Solomons from Sydney’s Kingsgrove Sports Centre, who has supplied bats to everyone from Doug Walters in the 1970s to recent test captain Michael Clarke, told [us] he was selling the oversized Kaboom model of bat endorsed by Warner as recently as Monday afternoon because nobody in the cricketing community expected the MCC’s ban on power-laden equipment to extend to amateur players The biggest-selling bats we  have are the biggest bats.  Yesterday we were stills elling the dAve Warner Kaboom. Everyone knew the rule was coming, but not for amateurs. … It is going to be a whole new ball game in bat-making.” (Australian, 7 marhc 20170).

 Image from Roberts, Essaying Cricket, (Colombo, 2005) — also deployed in an essay presenting Letter from Hary Solomons to The President of Sri Lanka, 18 March 2012, on urgent issues for cricket in the island – see https://cricketique.wordpress.com/2012/03/18/open-letter-to-president-from-harry-solomons/

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Kaboom bats thinned and creamed from late 2017

March 8, 2017

Robert Gould, in Herald Sun, 8 Decmeber 2016, anticipating a new MCC/ICC rule that willcome into force soon

DAVID Warner’s giant Kaboom bat could be turned in to a mere “Kaboo” when cricket laws are changed to reduce their size next year. Former Australian captain Ricky Ponting, as part of the MCC World Cricket Committee, has formally proposed limits to bat thicknesses after watching willow-wielders whack attacks too easily

Ponting’s group want the MCC main committee, which governs the Laws of the Game, to approve a limit to bat edges of 40mm and depths of 67mm, which would come in to force from next October.

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New Cricketing Rules from 1st October

March 8, 2017

From ESPNcricinfo, 6 March 2017, under title “New laws mean players can be sent off

Archive: Ponting not looking to rewind clocks too far back

The MCC has confirmed that umpires will have the authority to send players off for serious breaches of behaviour under updated laws of the game which will be used from October 1, 2017. They have also laid out the restrictions on bat sizes and there will be an amendment to the run out law to protect a batsman whose bat has bounced in the air once they have crossed the popping crease.

These new laws follow the recommendations of the MCC Cricket Committee from their meeting in Mumbai in early December.

 

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Bloody Awesome Bats! ##**!!**

December 7, 2016

Barry’s expression says it All! … courtesy of ESPNcricinfo, 7 December 2016

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 27: Former South African Batsman Barry Richards poses with the bat he made 325 in a single day at the Adelaide Oval and with the bat of David Warner of Australia during day one of the Third Test match between Australia and New Zealand at Adelaide Oval on November 27, 2015 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse - CA/Cricket Australia/Getty Images)

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 27: Former South African Batsman Barry Richards poses with the bat he made 325 in a single day at the Adelaide Oval and with the bat of David Warner of Australia during day one of the Third Test match between Australia and New Zealand at Adelaide Oval on November 27, 2015 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse – CA/Cricket Australia/Getty Images)

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AFP Report. Coroner’s Verdict on Phil Hughes’ Death: ‘Tiny Misjudgement’

November 6, 2016

AFP, 6 November 2016, http://www.hindustantimes.com/cricket/tiny-misjudgement-led-to-phil-hughes-unsurvivable-injury-coroner/story-QPQrHL4KG3AWBHtctD4anJ.html

Australian batsman Phillip Hughes made a “minuscule misjudgement” before he was fatally struck by a cricket ball, a coroner ruled on Friday, attaching no blame to the bowler, verbal abuse or the tactic of sending down short-pitched deliveries. Hughes, who played 26 Tests, died from bleeding on the brain in November 2014 after being hit on the neck by a rising ball from Sean Abbott while batting in a domestic match at the Sydney Cricket Ground. The death of the popular 25-year-old, who had risen through the ranks to play for his country, stunned Australia and the world cricket community, sparking an outpouring of grief.

cricket-aus-nzl-hughes-files_fea50f4a-a240-11e6-8b09-4d35dc1d77aaA photo of Phil Hughes is displayed on a scoreboard as a minute of silence is observed before play on the first day of the fourth Test match between Australia and India at the Sydney Cricket Ground on January 6, 2015, less than two months after Hughes’ death. (AFP)

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Sledging dirties a Beautiful Game, says Coroner Barnes in Hughes’ Inquest Verdict

November 6, 2016

 Sledging in the spotlight after Hughes inquiry”

The coronial inquest into the death of Phillip Hughes has raised questions around the culture of sledging in cricket. Hughes died in November 2014, two days after being struck by a ball in the back of the head while batting for South Australia in a Sheffield Shield game against NSW at the SCG. Although NSW Coroner Michael Barnes found no one was to blame, he took aim at what he said was an unhealthy culture of sledging by cricketers, who he urged to “reflect upon whether the practice … is worthy of its participantsAn outsider is left to wonder why such a beautiful game would need such an ugly underside,” Mr Barnes said.

Phil Hughes poses for a portrait during a Cricket Australia player camp. Picture: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images Read the rest of this entry ?

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A Miracle: Steve Smith Rapped on Knuckles for His Dissenting Reaction by Some Australian Commentators

November 6, 2016

Though Stuart Clark and some Australian commentators implied that Smith was hard done by, Robert Craddock, Ian Chappel and Wayne Smith were among those who upheld Aleem Dar’s decision and reprimanded Steve Smith for the character of his remonstrance. Also note Sangakakra’s decisive opinion on the issue of the Umpire’s cCall for lbw decision and DRS. Michael Roberts

ONE: Robert Craddock, in The Courier Mail, 6 November 2016. where the title is  Steve Smith walking a perilous tight rope as he struggles to find his identity as a captain”

STEVE Smith is a captain is like a young Steve Waugh, a man searching to find himself but not there yet. It’s no crime for a young captain to have a formulative period where he works out who he is and what he stands for. Some leaders like Mark Taylor knew from the moment he was appointed who he was and what he wanted to do (it helps if you have Warne and McGrath). Taylor barely changed in the five years he had the job. Most leaders take more time. Steve Waugh struggled for a while, trying to be all things to all people before deciding “stuff this … I am just going to back my gut feeling and cop the consequences.’’

Steve Smith is facing a fine for his on-field outburst after being given out LBW. Picture: Daniel Wilkins

It is difficult for Smith to take this stance and be the person he wants to be because there are so many conflicting and confusing forces around him. He is walking on a perilous tight rope which has trouble either side of it. On one hand he senses his side is a quiet one and needs to find his voice and aggression. He wants Australia to get its marauding mojo back.  On the other hand he is aware that in the fallout of the Phil Hughes death, sledging is suddenly a dirty word. So he and his team need to be confident but not arrogant, aggressive but not offensive, loud but not obnoxious. Read the rest of this entry ?