Archive for the ‘Daniel Brettig’ Category

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How Dubai training assisted Aussies in India: Nullifying Jadeja rather than Herath

March 4, 2017

Daniel Brettig, courtesy of ESPNcricinfo, where the title is “Australia enjoy fruits of Dubai detour”

The advantages derived from a visit to Dubai before the India Tests have become clear. Here’s how Australia ended up in the UAE, and what they had on offer there,
Australia had the chance to hit the ground running in India, after the time spent preparing for the series in Dubai © AFP

 

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Gunaratna, Munaweera and Malinga fashion Thrilling Sri Lanka Win

February 18, 2017

Daniel Brettig 

malinga-celebrates

Sri Lanka 5 for 172 (Gunaratne 52, Munaweera 44) beat Australia 6 for 168 (Finch 43, Malinga 2-29) by five wickets
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Aussie Cricketing Pundits Err in their Verdicts on Mitch Marsh LBW

November 9, 2016

Daniel Brettig,  in ESPNcricinfo, 8 November 2016, “Marsh LBW correctly tracked”

Mitchell Marsh’s hotly-debated LBW on the final day of the Perth Test was correctly tracked from its initial point of impact on the allrounder’s front toe, the custodians of EagleEye have confirmed. The decision, which was reversed from Aleem Dar’s initial verdict of not out due to the widening of the zone in which the stumps can be projected to hit by the ICC earlier this year, was openly questioned by a succession of television commentators and also Australia’s captain, Steven Smith, who said it was like Kagiso Rabada was bowling “leg-spin”. The former captain Michael Clarke stated on Channel Nine’s cricket coverage that he was certain the ball was going down the leg side. “I was certain that was missing the stumps,” Clarke said. “When you look at that replay, I thought it was definitely swinging too far and missing the leg stump. “He’ll be really disappointed with that. It has clipped his toe, then clipped his pad, and then got onto the bat. But what I don’t agree with is the line of the delivery once the ball hits him on the toe … I believe the line of that delivery is going down and missing leg stump.”

PERTH, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 07: Mitch Marsh of Australia looks dejected after being dismissed by Kagiso Rabada of South Africa after a DRS referal during day five of the First Test match between Australia and South Africa at WACA on November 7, 2016 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse - CA/Cricket Australia/Getty Images)

PERTH, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 07: Mitch Marsh of Australia looks dejected after being dismissed by Kagiso Rabada of South Africa after a DRS referal during day five of the First Test match between Australia and South Africa at WACA on November 7, 2016 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse – CA/Cricket Australia/Getty Images)

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Coroner Barnes exonerates Australian Cricketing Philosophy in Verdict on Hughes’ Incident

November 4, 2016

Brydon Coverdale in ESPNcricinfo, 5 November 2016, where the title is “Players, umpires cleared of fault in Hughes’ death,”

scales-of-justice  The death of Phillip Hughes was a tragic accident arising from a “minuscule misjudgement” from the batsman and no players or umpires were at fault, according to the New South Wales coroner Michael Barnes.  Mr Barnes on Friday released his findings from the coronial inquest into the death of Hughes, who was struck on the neck by a bouncer during a Sheffield Shield match at the SCG in November 2014. Although the coroner determined that Hughes had been targeted by bouncers during his innings, he found that no laws of the game had been breached, and Hughes was well-equipped to deal with such bowling.

Phillip was targeted by short-pitched balls bowled at or over leg stump or middle stump that placed him in greater danger of being struck,” Mr Barnes said. “Of the 23 bouncers bowled on that day, 20 were bowled to him. However, in view of the evidence of the other players, the presiding umpires, and Mr Taufel [former umpire Simon Taufel], that Phillip was, because of his high level of skill and confidence, comfortably dealing with the short-pitched balls, I conclude that no failure to enforce the laws of the game contributed to his death. The death of  Read the rest of this entry ?

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Call for Clarification of Bouncer Laws at Inquest into the Phil Hughes Death

October 14, 2016

Daniel Brettig,  in ESPNcricinfo, 14 October 2016, with title “Clarify bouncer laws, Phillip Hughes inquest told”  

Definitions of what constitutes “unfair bowling” should be clarified by cricket’s lawmakers, the New South Wales coronial inquest into the death of Phillip Hughes has heard on an emotion-charged final day. Counsel assisting the coroner, Kristina Stern SC, submitted that the inquest should conclude that this was a case of “accidental death”, which was not made more likely by the nature of play on the day of the Sheffield Shield match at the SCG. Hughes was struck in the side of the neck on day one of the match, November 25, 2014, suffering an arterial injury that resulted in his death at St Vincent’s Hospital two days later.hughes_3116917bhughes-and-helmetphil-hughes

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Clementine Reviews the Aussie Series

August 19, 2016

Rex Clementine, in The Island, 19 August 2016, where the title is Cherishing our finest hour in cricket”

The great game of ours is filled with uncertainties. Steven Smith arrived in Colombo having not lost a Test match in the 11 games he had been in charge as Australian captain. Australia were world’s number one ranked team. Their preparations were meticulous.

By arriving 17 days before the first Test, the tourists wanted to be well prepared for the turning tracks here. They used Sri Lankan experts such as Muttiah Muralitharan and Tilan Samaraweera to stay one step ahead of the opponents.

Sri Lanka meanwhile arrived in the island following their tour of England with their heads down. To sum it up, the England tour was a nightmare. The experts were of the view that it will take a considerable time for Sri Lankans to be competitive in international cricket again. Coach Graham Ford wasn’t sure how he was going to make the turnaround happen. He had toiled tirelessly with little result. But he didn’t lose hope. John Wooden, one of the finest basketball coaches used to say, ‘Don’t complain about not having talented athletes. If you keep working hard, talent will emerge.” Ford seemed to have believed in that mantra for some of the younger players he backed in the series made a huge difference. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Brettig’s Brilliant Deciphering of Test Disasters in Lanka

August 17, 2016

Daniel Brettig, courtesy of ESPNcricinfo, 17 August 2016, where the title is Clueless Australia need a cultural shift”

In 1969, when choosing the Australian touring team for India, the selectors omitted a young Greg Chappell to the surprise of many. When pressed for a reason why, the selection chairman Sir Donald Bradman is said to have replied: “We don’t want him going to India and getting sick.” Though Bill Lawry’s team went on to win a fractious and tightly contested series, Bradman’s comment endured as a summation of Australian attitudes to Asia for years afterwards. It was the place you went to to get sick, to have your batting average halved by wily spinners and trigger-happy umpires, and to have your back broken by pitches designed to break fast bowlers’ hearts. Tim May, the former Test spin bowler, penned a satirical book called Mayhem, that focused on digestive misadventures as the hallmark of trips to the subcontinent.

herath plus -AFP Hero Herath celebrates —Pic AFP

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