Archive for the ‘memorable moments’ Category

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Jofra Archer empties the LORD’s Bar

August 18, 2019

A REVIEW from one ERROL in a Note to one GAVIN, 18 August 2019

The message I am receiving is that it is all over and Tim Paine already has the Ashes in his suitcase. Of course, this may well be true. However, I merely want people to hold on a moment because I would always back the side bowling fourth. I would hate to be the side chasing even one hundred to win a match. The nerves and tension are usually unbearable.

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Statistical Oddities and Other Odds and Ends from the Galle Test Match and Beyond

August 17, 2019

133* – The partnership between Dimuth Karunaratne and Lahiru Thirimanne is Sri Lanka’s highest for the first wicket in the fourth innings of a Test. Karunaratne was involved in the previous highest as well – 124 with Kaushal Silva, against Pakistan in Dubai in 2014. Sri Lanka were chasing a target of 137 then, and won by nine wickets.

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Dimuth Karunaratne stands as Calm as Tall

August 17, 2019

Andrew Fidel Fernando in ESPNcricinfo, 17 August 2019, where the title runs “Karunaratne, a cool captain for Sri Lanka’s high seas”

The selectors are making strange picks, the board is trying to sack another coach, the sports minister is making serious overreaches, the XI changes from series to series, but from amid this chaos, which to many has seemed like the wreckage of a once-was cricketing power, Dimuth Karunaratne has eked out a small but significant patch of stability.

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In Appreciation of Neville Cardus, son of a whore and a discerning cricket writer

August 4, 2019

Roger Alton for the Daily Mail, 1 August 2019,  with title “Pitch Perfect”

THE  GREAT ROMANTIC  …… by Duncan Hamilton (Hodder £20, 400 pp)

A FIELD OF TENTS AND WAVING COLOURS …………….  by Neville Cardus (Safe Haven £14.99, 240 pp)

The last days of summer may soon be upon us — give or take an Ashes tour — but, with these two beautiful books, the sky will always be silky blue, the sun shining down, thousands pouring into Old Trafford for a bitterly fought Roses match and Bradman 160 not out at tea.

Duncan Hamilton is already a multiple award-winning sports writer, but it is hard to imagine he will write a better book than this superb, elegaic portrait of the sociable, feted, but ultimately unknowable, man who virtually invented modern sports writing. Neville Cardus was born, illegitimate, into poverty in 1888. His real name was John Frederick Newsham, but he never knew his father. Both his mother and his aunt worked as prostitutes, and the young Fred Newsham was lightly educated to the age of ten.

Two beautifully written books reflect on how sports writing was impacted by Neville Cardus (pictured) who became one of the best-paid journalists in historyTwo beautifully written books reflect on how sports writing was impacted by Neville Cardus (pictured) who became one of the best-paid journalists in history

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Swooning over Lasith Malinga

August 2, 2019

On any other working Friday, the toss wouldn’t have held much significance. But this was different. Lasith Malinga was playing his final ODI, and had Bangladesh batted first, which Tamim Iqbal later said they were certain to do had they won the toss, Malinga’s final 10 overs may have played out in front of a half-empty R Premadasa Stadium. Not a disaster, but certainly anti-climactic.

However, as it turned out, Bangladesh didn’t win the toss, they didn’t bat first, and as the Sri Lankan innings started to wind to a close, the fans filtering in late were even treated to a rare a Malinga batting excursion.

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A Rescue Act Aged 41! Facing Lillee and Thomson

August 2, 2019

Simon Barnes in The Cricket Monthly, June 2016, where the title is “Call in Colin” … At 41, Cowdrey gamely took on Lillee and Thomson, because how could he not?

“Good morning, my name’s Cowdrey.” Words of Colin Cowdrey to Jeff Thomson in December 1974, spoken while Thomson was back at the top of his run “wanting to kill somebody”. It was a moment that mixed courtesy with a hint of gamesmanship in one of cricket’s more bizarre confrontations.

And a good morning to you Sir!

Cowdrey’s participation in that Ashes series was a classic example of futile heroism, and as such a thing of joy that echoes down the ages long after more elevated passages of sport have been forgotten. “We need a futile sacrifice at this stage,” said Peter Cook in a famous sketch from Beyond the Fringe. “It will raise the whole tone of the war.” Read the rest of this entry ?

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Ireland at Lords: From Dream Start to Apocalyptic Crash

July 27, 2019

George Dobell, in ESPNcricinfo, 26 July 2019, where the title is “Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad wreck Ireland dream in a session”

England have completed one of the great comeback victories in Test history after bowling out Ireland for 38 in the fourth innings at Lord’s.

Not since 1907, when England defeated South Africa in Leeds despite having made just 76 in their first innings, has a side won a Test having made such a low first-innings score. But despite England being bowled out for 85 before lunch on the first day, a devastating spell of new ball bowling from Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad saw Ireland bowled out in just 15.4 overs to leave England the victors by 143 runs. It is the fifth lowest first-innings total in history to have resulted in a win and the first Test since 1887 in which two sides have each been bowled out in a single session.

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