Archive for the ‘unusual statistics’ Category

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A Miracle at Lords: England Down India in Thriller … Now, Now Where were you Then?

July 28, 2018

Melinda Farrell in ESPNcricinfo, 24 July 2018, “Where were you?”

Where were you when England won the World Cup?

Where were you on Sunday morning when the queues to get into the ground, half of them women and girls, stretched along Wellington Parade almost the entire way to St John’s Wood station? Were you in the excited, buzzing throng, ignoring the touts? Who could have imagined they would ever hear the slightly seedy muttering of “Buy or sell any tickets? Buy or sell any tickets?” on their way to a women’s match?

 Alex Hartley enjoys taking the wicket of Harmanpreet Kaur AFP

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Mushfiqur Rahim’s Unique Last-Over Blues

July 26, 2018

Mohamed Isam, in ESPNcricinfo, July 27 July 2018, where the title reads “

Georgetown. Dehradun. Bengaluru. Harare. These four cities, connected by a line more than 18,000km long, have one thing in common: tense chases in which Mushfiqur Rahim has been caught on the leg-side boundary in the last over.

It has now happened five times in the last seven years, and Bangladesh have lost on each occasion, heartbreakingly, from positions of strength. Georgetown was the latest entrant on this list. This time, Mushfiqur was out hitting a Jason Holder full-toss down deep midwicket’s throat, leaving the side with eight needed off the last five balls. He had batted brilliantly up to that point to score 68 off 66 balls.

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Cricketing Odd Spots: Meeting Odd Questions

July 17, 2018

Steven Lynch in ESPNcricinfo, …. http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/24117089/how-many-s-openers-stumped-same-innings-test

Was Kuldeep Yadav’s 6 for 25 the other day the best figures by a left-arm wristspinner in an ODI? asked Sudip Chauhan from India
That mesmerising 6 for 25 by Kuldeep Yadav against England at Trent Bridgelast week weren’t just the best figures by a left-arm wristspinner in a one-day international – they were the best figures by a slow left-armer of any sort. The previous record was held by another Indian, the more orthodox Murali Kartik, who took 6 for 27 against Australia in Mumbai in 2007. Sanath Jayasuriya, with 6 for 29 for Sri Lanka against England in Moratuwa in 1992-93, is the only other slow left-armer to take six wickets in an ODI. The previous-best by a left-arm wristspinner was Brad Hogg’s 5 for 32 for Australia against West Indies in Melbourne in 2004-05.

Before Kuldeep Yadav’s 6 for 25, the best figures ODI by a left-arm spinner were 6 for 27 by Murali Kartik, against Australia in Mumbai in 2007 AFP

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Royal College Cricket Report for 1931

March 28, 2018

Courtesy of Lionel Gunesekera of Dickman’s Rd, Colombo, with re-typing by Nadeeka Paththuwaarachchi of Battaramulla

Royal—St. Thomas 

This match was played on the 12th and 13th March on the S.S.C. grounds. The usual preparations were made and everything was set for a fine match. Rain which had threatened on the 11th kept off, and the wicket was in ideal condition. The two teams sat for the usual group photograph. At, 11-45 R. Senanayake and F. C. de Saram inspected the wicket and Senanayake tossed. To the great joy of all Royalists de Saram won and decided to bat. This is the fourth year in succession that S.T.C. have lost the toss.

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What a Violent and Unique Six-Balls in Test Cricket! …. with Just Desserts!

March 23, 2018

Rabada to Warner in Over 03

3.4 = Rabada to Warner, FOUR runs, too full, rifled to the cover boundary! Warner climbs into a cover drive, low in his stance and using 141kph to his own advantage
3.5 =Rabada to Warner, FOUR runs, oh, even better, a murderous scyth past extra cover for four! This wasn’t a half-volley but he dispatched it via first-class delivery to the ropes
3.6 =Rabada to Warner, FOUR runs, skelped off the pads, three in a row! Morkel gamely gives chase but he can’t reel it in, Warner lets his bat do the talking in his battle with Rabada – this could become a proper brawl (within the confines of the Laws, of course!)
Rabada to Warner in Over 05
5.1 =Rabada to Warner, SIX runs, digs the ball in short… and Warner hurls his bat, KABOOM! over fine leg! That has gone miles, high up into the stands – someone is going to have to fetch it!

5. 2 =Rabada to Warner, (no ball) FOUR runs, FETCH THAT! Five boundaries in a row for Warner off Rabada! Just a touch of width and he slashes it through backward point, and you can sense KG’s temperature rising!…………….Rabada had overstepped too… Literally, not figuratively this time

5.3 =Rabada to Warner, OUTbowled hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim! Rabada lands the decisive blow, up off the canvas and demolishing off stump! This enthralling duel is ended by Rabada slicing through Warner’s tentative defence and sending the stump pinwheeling back. An extraordinary innings from Warner, struck on the arm and then responding with a flurry of boundaries before being run through, bowled off stump for the third time in the series

DA Warner b Rabada 30 (28m 14b 5×4 1×6) SR: 214.28

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Oddities in the Lanka Bangla T 20 Match at

February 16, 2018

  Kusal plays ramp shot

* In the  hectic high scoring match Sri Lanka bowled 15 WIDES... and Bangladesh nearly matched them

* Kusal Mendis beat Thisara Perera by a whisker perhaps — for Man of the Match though his scoring rate was less and he did not take any wickets [he did not bowl]

* Allrounder Dasun Shanaka did not bowl but rendered yeoman service at No. 4 with 42 runs in 25 balls at the rate of 175.00

* Shanaka and Udana marched in ahead of Thisara Perera and all three left Chandimal to bite his fingers in the dressing room. SO: who took that meaningful and effective decision to shuffle the order? Chandimal? OR….. Hathuru? … OR … Think-tank?

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Move IN Wrist-Spinner! Move INTO the T20 Format

February 15, 2018

Why are legspinners so successful in the shorter formats?
There are plenty of factors that go in favour of legspinners in shorter formats.

They have the ability to take the ball away, off the surface, from both left- and right-hand batsmen without bending the elbow or the rules. Read the rest of this entry ?