Archive for the ‘verbal intimidation’ Category

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Ranjan Mellawa’s Pursuit of Cricket Luv’ly Cricket

April 24, 2017

Elmo Jayawardena, with the title Winds Behind The Willows – The Full Monty to Cricket

One has to know something about cricket to enjoy this magnificent book. Suited me ideally as I do not know much about cricket matters but like almost all Sri Lankans I too am connected umbilically to international cricket and especially when the home country is at the crease. Let me try and express my views on author Ranjan Mellawa writing a book. I can categorically state that if not the bull’s eye, he certainly has hit pretty close to it as a new author in his maiden venture on cricket journalism.

The man has managed to vagabond his way to be present at six World Cup finals. That alone gives him credentials to be somewhat an expert on the international scene from a spectator’s point of view. Ranjan has been an ardent cricket fan. He’s played too, starting with a plastic bat as a kid to rustic cricket in neighborhood tennis-ball matches. From there he graduated to club level domestic league. Hence, his story begins at grass-root level and then blossoms and spreads wild and wide taking him to the world of international cricket as a die-hard knowledgeable fan. Read the rest of this entry ?

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AFP Report. Coroner’s Verdict on Phil Hughes’ Death: ‘Tiny Misjudgement’

November 6, 2016

AFP, 6 November 2016, http://www.hindustantimes.com/cricket/tiny-misjudgement-led-to-phil-hughes-unsurvivable-injury-coroner/story-QPQrHL4KG3AWBHtctD4anJ.html

Australian batsman Phillip Hughes made a “minuscule misjudgement” before he was fatally struck by a cricket ball, a coroner ruled on Friday, attaching no blame to the bowler, verbal abuse or the tactic of sending down short-pitched deliveries. Hughes, who played 26 Tests, died from bleeding on the brain in November 2014 after being hit on the neck by a rising ball from Sean Abbott while batting in a domestic match at the Sydney Cricket Ground. The death of the popular 25-year-old, who had risen through the ranks to play for his country, stunned Australia and the world cricket community, sparking an outpouring of grief.

cricket-aus-nzl-hughes-files_fea50f4a-a240-11e6-8b09-4d35dc1d77aaA photo of Phil Hughes is displayed on a scoreboard as a minute of silence is observed before play on the first day of the fourth Test match between Australia and India at the Sydney Cricket Ground on January 6, 2015, less than two months after Hughes’ death. (AFP)

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Sledging dirties a Beautiful Game, says Coroner Barnes in Hughes’ Inquest Verdict

November 6, 2016

 Sledging in the spotlight after Hughes inquiry”

The coronial inquest into the death of Phillip Hughes has raised questions around the culture of sledging in cricket. Hughes died in November 2014, two days after being struck by a ball in the back of the head while batting for South Australia in a Sheffield Shield game against NSW at the SCG. Although NSW Coroner Michael Barnes found no one was to blame, he took aim at what he said was an unhealthy culture of sledging by cricketers, who he urged to “reflect upon whether the practice … is worthy of its participantsAn outsider is left to wonder why such a beautiful game would need such an ugly underside,” Mr Barnes said.

Phil Hughes poses for a portrait during a Cricket Australia player camp. Picture: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images Read the rest of this entry ?

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Coroner Barnes exonerates Australian Cricketing Philosophy in Verdict on Hughes’ Incident

November 4, 2016

Brydon Coverdale in ESPNcricinfo, 5 November 2016, where the title is “Players, umpires cleared of fault in Hughes’ death,”

scales-of-justice  The death of Phillip Hughes was a tragic accident arising from a “minuscule misjudgement” from the batsman and no players or umpires were at fault, according to the New South Wales coroner Michael Barnes.  Mr Barnes on Friday released his findings from the coronial inquest into the death of Hughes, who was struck on the neck by a bouncer during a Sheffield Shield match at the SCG in November 2014. Although the coroner determined that Hughes had been targeted by bouncers during his innings, he found that no laws of the game had been breached, and Hughes was well-equipped to deal with such bowling.

Phillip was targeted by short-pitched balls bowled at or over leg stump or middle stump that placed him in greater danger of being struck,” Mr Barnes said. “Of the 23 bouncers bowled on that day, 20 were bowled to him. However, in view of the evidence of the other players, the presiding umpires, and Mr Taufel [former umpire Simon Taufel], that Phillip was, because of his high level of skill and confidence, comfortably dealing with the short-pitched balls, I conclude that no failure to enforce the laws of the game contributed to his death. The death of  Read the rest of this entry ?

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Aussie Cricketers duck, weave & dissimulate at Phil Hughes Coronial Inquest

October 23, 2016

Ben Horne,  in Daily Telegraph, 14 October 2016, where the title is “Lawyers duel it out at inquest into death of cricketer Phil Hughes”

GREG Melick, the counsel for the Hughes family, has attacked Australian cricketers over their failure to “recall” incidents that took place when Phil Hughes was struck. The extraordinary allegation has been countered by the counsel representing Cricket Australia and its players. The CA counsel also asked the State Coroner Michael Barnes to dismiss the “unsubstantiated” evidence lodged via Hughes’ family friend Matt Day. Counsel Assisting the Coroner also submitted that there was nothing to support an assertion that cricketers had “fabricated” their evidence.

Greg and Virginia Hughes stormed out of the inquest while submissions were still ongoing. Picture: Ross Schultz

Melick openly questioned the honesty of the four cricketers called to the stand to give evidence this week. Asking why Brad Haddin, Doug Bollinger, David Warner and Tom Cooper answered so many questions with explanations like “no recollection” or “I can’t recall.” Melick said his criticisms of the testimony provided by players did not apply to the statement provided by Sean Abbott due to the very acute trauma he has experienced.

 

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Oh What a Feeling!

October 20, 2016

aaa-will-s

... ……. especially so IF the catch is dropped !! 

Was it?

….  I do not know

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Call for Clarification of Bouncer Laws at Inquest into the Phil Hughes Death

October 14, 2016

Daniel Brettig,  in ESPNcricinfo, 14 October 2016, with title “Clarify bouncer laws, Phillip Hughes inquest told”  

Definitions of what constitutes “unfair bowling” should be clarified by cricket’s lawmakers, the New South Wales coronial inquest into the death of Phillip Hughes has heard on an emotion-charged final day. Counsel assisting the coroner, Kristina Stern SC, submitted that the inquest should conclude that this was a case of “accidental death”, which was not made more likely by the nature of play on the day of the Sheffield Shield match at the SCG. Hughes was struck in the side of the neck on day one of the match, November 25, 2014, suffering an arterial injury that resulted in his death at St Vincent’s Hospital two days later.hughes_3116917bhughes-and-helmetphil-hughes

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